Winter driving sometimes a challenge. When you drive, remember that speed limits are meant for dry roads, not roads covered in snow and ice. You should reduce your speed and increase your following distance as road conditions and visibility worsen. Avoid using cruise control in snowy or icy conditions, you want as much control of your car as possible. Be cautious on bridges and overpasses as they are commonly the first areas to become icy, and avoid passing snow plows and sand trucks. The drivers can have limited visibility, and the road in front of them could be worse than the road behind. Always make sure that you drive at a speed that you are comfortable at. This can also help you to maintain control of your vehicle when you drive.

Snowstorm driving

If you do go out or are unexpectedly caught in a snowstorm and encounter problems, if your car is safely out of harm’s way, stay in your car and wait for help. You can run the car heater to stay warm for 10 minutes every hour, but make sure your exhaust pipe is clear of snow. There is a danger of carbon monoxide poisoning if snow blocks the pipe and enables the deadly gas to build up in your car. Open your window slightly to help prevent any buildup.

winter driving

Take your time

Slowing down, allowing increased time to come to a stop, wearing your seatbelt, devoting your full attention to the road and being aware of changing conditions can help you drive more safely. If your travel route takes you into remote areas with limited cell phone coverage, consider informing someone of your travel plans that include your route and when you plan to arrive. This way, if you are overdue, first responders will know where to start looking. If you are unsure whether it is safe to drive, consider waiting until the roads improve. If you do notice an issue with your vehicle when you drive, make sure to schedule an appointment with us. By doing so, you can help improve the safety and reliability of your vehicle.